Tag Archives: french phrases

Je suis malade

I feel sick. Maybe talking about it in French will make me feel better.

J’ai un mal à la tête. I have a headache.
Je suis fatigué. I’m tired.
J’ai froid. I’m cold.*

Elle a un rhume. She has a cold.
Elle a un nez qui coule. She has a runny nose.
Elle a le vertige. She is dizzy.

Il a la grippe. He has the flu.
Il a de la fièvre. He has a fever.
Il a chaud. He is hot.*

Tu te sens bien? Do you feel well?

*In English, we say I AM or he/she IS – forms of the verb “to be.” In French, the verb is avoir – “to have” – literally translated “I have (a feeling of) cold” or “He has hot.”

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Tempting temps

Today was very spring-like. The French word for spring is printemps, the charming prince of temperatures.

I’ve seen the word temps a few times in my studies, sometimes referring to the weather:

Quel temps fait-il au printemps? What’s the weather like in spring?

Il fait beau temps. The weather is fine.

L'Air du Temps by Nina Ricci

L’Air du Temps by Nina Ricci

L’Air du Temps. The prevailing atmosphere.

And sometimes referring to time:

Je suis pressé par le temps. I’m pressed for time.

de temps en temps … from time to time

juste à temps … in the nick of time (just in time!)

When both are used together, the resulting rhyme is quite poetic:

“C’est le printemps
L’printemps tout l’temps avec toi”
— Richard Petit, “Le Printemps”

~ It’s spring / spring all the time with you. ~

A springy playlist of French music: Enfin le Printemps! at ilovefrenchmusic.com