Category Archives: phrases

Je suis malade

I feel sick. Maybe talking about it in French will make me feel better.

J’ai un mal à la tête. I have a headache.
Je suis fatigué. I’m tired.
J’ai froid. I’m cold.*

Elle a un rhume. She has a cold.
Elle a un nez qui coule. She has a runny nose.
Elle a le vertige. She is dizzy.

Il a la grippe. He has the flu.
Il a de la fièvre. He has a fever.
Il a chaud. He is hot.*

Tu te sens bien? Do you feel well?

*In English, we say I AM or he/she IS – forms of the verb “to be.” In French, the verb is avoir – “to have” – literally translated “I have (a feeling of) cold” or “He has hot.”

Tempting temps

Today was very spring-like. The French word for spring is printemps, the charming prince of temperatures.

I’ve seen the word temps a few times in my studies, sometimes referring to the weather:

Quel temps fait-il au printemps? What’s the weather like in spring?

Il fait beau temps. The weather is fine.

L'Air du Temps by Nina Ricci

L’Air du Temps by Nina Ricci

L’Air du Temps. The prevailing atmosphere.

And sometimes referring to time:

Je suis pressé par le temps. I’m pressed for time.

de temps en temps … from time to time

juste à temps … in the nick of time (just in time!)

When both are used together, the resulting rhyme is quite poetic:

“C’est le printemps
L’printemps tout l’temps avec toi”
— Richard Petit, “Le Printemps”

~ It’s spring / spring all the time with you. ~

A springy playlist of French music: Enfin le Printemps! at ilovefrenchmusic.com

 

French at the Olympics

The French have long loved the Olympic Games. French is even the official language of the Olympics. Be sure to listen during the Opening Ceremony tomorrow night (7:30 EST). You’ll get to hear many country names as they are pronounced en français!

The very first Jeux Olympiques d’hiver (Winter Olympic Games) were held in France— in Chamonix, in 1924. France has hosted a total of five Olympic Games (second only to aux Etats-Unis, the United States, which has hosted eight times): 1900 Summer Olympics, in Paris; 1924 Olympics, d’hiver (winter) in Chamonix and été (summer) in Paris (just another reason why Paris was the place to be in the 20s!); 1968 Winter Games in Grenoble; and 1992 Winter Games in Albertville.

I’d say France is due to host again soon, wouldn’t you? Rumor has it they’re planning a bid for either Paris or Nice for the 2024 Summer Games. If they win, I am so there.

Here are some sporty things to say in French:

Je vais au le stade olympique.
I am going to the Olympic stadium.

Je vais pour l’équipe française.
I am going for (rooting for) the French team.

Mon sport préféré est le ski.
My favorite sport is skiing.

Son sport préféré est le patinage artistique.
His/her favorite sport is figure skating.

J’aime jouer au hockey sur glace.
I like to play ice hockey.

Il est sur les podiums.
He is a medal winner. (He is “on the podiums.” Je t’aime!)

Elle a remporté une médaille d’or.
She won a gold medal.

Il a remporté une médaille d’argent.
He won a silver medal.

20140204-130002.jpg

Andrée Joly and Pierre Brunet of France, bronze medallists in pairs figure skating in Chamonix, 1924

Ils ont remporté une médaille de bronze.
They won a bronze medal.

Que le meilleur gagne.
May the best win.